“Grace is the beginning of glory” by Thomas Manton

“Grace is the beginning of glory, and glory is but grace perfected.

Grace is glory in the bud, and moulding, and making; for when the apostle would express our whole conformity to Christ, he only expresseth it thus, ‘We are changed into his image from glory to glory,’ (2 Cor 3:18), that is, from one degree of grace to another.

It is called glory, because the progress of holiness never ceaseth till it comes to the perfection of glory and life eternal. The first degree of grace is glory begun, and the final consummation is glory perfected.

All the degrees of our conformity to Christ are so called. It is a bud of that sinless, pure, immaculate estate which shall be without spot and wrinkle; the seed of that perfect holiness which shall be bestowed upon us hereafter.

Thus the spiritual life is described in its whole flux; it begins in grace, and ends in glory.

See the golden chain: Rom. 8:30, ‘Whom he hath called, them he also justified; and whom he justified, them he also glorified.’

There is no mention of sanctification, for that is included in glory.

Grace is but young glory, and differs from glory as an infant doth from a man; therefore by degrees the Lord will have you enter upon your everlasting inheritance.”

–Thomas Manton, The Works of Thomas Manton, Vol. 13 (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1870/2020), 13: 331.

“The extraordinary kindness of Christ” by Thomas Manton

“I will pay my portion and share of thanks and respect. But this cannot be applied to this extraordinary kindness of Christ, for every man is indebted for the whole, not every man for a part of redemption.

God’s love to every one is infinite, and He hath paid an infinite price for thee, purchased an infinite happiness to thee.

His love to thee was without measure and bounds, so must thy thankfulness be to Him without stint and limit.

Though Christ died for others as well as thee, yet thou art bound to love Him no less than if it had been for thee alone.

He shed His whole blood for thee, and every drop was poured out for thy sake.”

–Thomas Manton, The Works of Thomas Manton, Vol. 2 (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1870/2020), 2: 296–297.

“He lives to make you everlastingly happy” by Thomas Manton

“Christ is a fit object for worship and service.

Every being is the more noble the more life it hath in it; the life of things is the commendation of them: Eccles. 9:4, ‘A living dog is better than a dead lion;’ better, that is, more noble.

Now, since Christ hath the noblest and the highest being, he liveth forever. The Scriptures often call upon us to trust in the living God: Ps. 42:2, ‘My soul thirsteth for the living God.’

Who would go to the dead cistern, and leave the living fountain? Alas! what is a man the better for a dead idol? All the satisfaction of the spirit lieth in the life of him whom we worship.

Now Christ is not only living, but living forever. Your hopes in Him will not run waste.

A prince, whose breath is in his nostrils, may uphold his favourites during his life, but upon his death they may be brought from the crown of their excellency to the dust of scorn and ignominy.

But Jesus Christ never dieth. As Bathsheba said to David, 1 Kings 1:21, ‘When my lord the king shall sleep with his fathers, I and my son Solomon shall be counted offenders.’ All their care and cost is lost.

But it cannot be so with Jesus Christ. He lives to make you everlastingly happy.”

–Thomas Manton, “A Practical Exposition Upon the 53rd Chapter of Isaiah,” The Works of Thomas Manton, Vol. 3 (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1870/2020), 3: 360.

“We shall live to remember the galaxies as an old tale” by C.S. Lewis

“We shall live forever. There will come a time when every culture, every institution, every nation, the human race, all biological life is extinct and every one of us is still alive. Immortality is promised to us, not to these generalities. It was not for societies or states that Christ died, but for men.

In that sense Christianity must seem to secular collectivists to involve an almost frantic assertion of individuality. But then it is not the individual as such who will share Christ’s victory over death. We shall share the victory by being in the Victor. A rejection, or in Scripture’s strong language, a crucifixion of the natural self is the passport to everlasting life.

Nothing that has not died will be resurrected. That is just how Christianity cuts across the antithesis between individualism and collectivism. There lies the maddening ambiguity of our faith as it must appear to outsiders. It sets its face relentlessly against our natural individualism; on the other hand, it gives back to those who abandon individualism an eternal possession of their own personal being, even of their bodies.

As mere biological entities, each with its separate will to live to expand, we are apparently of no account; we are cross-fodder. But as organs in the Body of Christ, as stones and pillars in the temple, we are assured of our eternal self-identity and shall live to remember the galaxies as an old tale.”

-–C. S. Lewis, “Membership” in The Weight of Glory: And Other Addresses (New York: HarperCollins, 1949/2001), 172-3.

“We are derived beings” by C.S. Lewis

“We shall be true and everlasting and really divine persons only in Heaven, just as we are, even now, coloured bodies only in the light. To say this is to repeat what everyone here admits already– that we are saved by grace, that in our flesh dwells no good thing, that we are, through and through, creatures not creators, derived beings, living not of ourselves but from Christ.”

-–C. S. Lewis, “Membership” in The Weight of Glory: And Other Addresses (New York: HarperCollins, 1949/2001), 174-5.