“God’s happiness is inseparably linked in with His holiness” by Robert Murray M’Cheyne

“To gain entire likeness to Christ, I ought to get a high esteem of the happiness of it. I am persuaded that God’s happiness is inseparably linked in with His holiness.

Holiness and happiness are like light and heat. God never tasted one of the pleasures of sin.

Christ had a body such as I have, yet He never tasted one of the pleasures of sin.

The redeemed, through all eternity, will never taste one of the pleasures of sin; yet their happiness is complete. It would be my greatest happiness to be from this moment entirely like them.

Every sin is something away from my greatest enjoyment. The devil strives night and day to make me forget this or disbelieve it.

He says, ‘Why should you not enjoy this pleasure as much as Solomon or David? You may go to heaven also.’

I am persuaded that this is a lie. I am persuaded that my true happiness is to go and sin no more.”

–Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Ed. Andrew A. Bonar (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1844/1966), 154-155.

“The greatest outlets of His glory that ever were” by Robert Murray M’Cheyne

“The wounds of Christ were the greatest outlets of His glory that ever were. The divine glory shone more out of His wounds than out of all His life before.

The veil was then rent in twain, and the full heart of God allowed to stream through.

It was a human body that writhed, pale and racked, upon the accursed tree.

They were human hands that were pierced so rudely by the nails.

It was human flesh that bore that deadly gash upon the side.

It was human blood that streamed from hands, and feet, and side.

The eye that meekly turned to His Father was a human eye.

The soul that yearned over His mother was a human soul.

But oh, there was divine glory streaming through all: every wound was a mouth to speak of the grace and love of God!

Divine holiness shone through. What infinite hatred of sin was there when He thus offered Himself a sacrifice without spot unto God!

Divine wisdom shone through: all created intelligences could not have devised a plan whereby God would have been just, and yet the justifies.

Divine love: every drop of blood that fell came as a messenger of love from his heart to tell the love of the fountain. This was the love of God.

He that hath seen a crucified Christ hath seen the Father.

Oh, look on the broken bread, and you will see this glory still streaming through!

Here is the heart of God laid bare,—God is manifest in flesh.

Some of you are poring over your own heart,—examining your feelings,—watching your disease. Avert the eye from all within.

‘Behold Me,—behold Me!’ Christ cries. ‘Look to Me, and be ye saved.’

Behold the glory of Christ!

There is much difficulty about your own heart, but no darkness about the heart of Christ.

Look in through His wounds; believe what you see in Him.”

–Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Ed. Andrew A. Bonar (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1844/1966), 472-473.

“The only cure for a cold heart” by Robert Murray M’Cheyne

“‘We love Him, because He first loved us.’ (1 John 4:19)

The only cure for a cold heart is to look at the heart of Jesus.”

–Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Ed. Andrew A. Bonar (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1844/1966), 414.

“There are unsearchable riches in Christ” by Robert Murray M’Cheyne

“Precious friend and unchangeable priest is Christ— sweeter to you than honey and the honeycomb.

How great is the goodness He hath laid up for them that fear Him! Just as the miser lays up money that he may feast his eyes upon it, so Christ has laid up unsearchable riches that He may supply all our need out of them.

Unfathomable oceans of grace are in Christ for you. Dive and dive again, you will never come to the bottom of these depths.

How many millions of dazzling pearls and gems are at this moment hid in the deep recesses of the ocean caves! But there are unsearchable riches in Christ.

Seek more of them. The Lord enrich you with them.”

–Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray M’Cheyne, Ed. Andrew A. Bonar (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1844/1966), 274-275.

“The fruit of free grace” by Thomas Brooks

“Look upon all that you have received, and all that you shall hereafter receive, as the fruit of free grace.

Look upon thy adoption, and write this motto, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon thy justification, and write this motto, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon all thy graces, and write, These are the fruits of free grace.

Look upon thy experiences, and write, These are the fruits of free grace.

Look upon thy strength to withstand temptations, and write, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon divine power to conquer corruptions, and write, This is the fruit of free grace.

Look upon the bread thou eatest, the beer thou drinkest, the clothes thou wearest, and write, These are the fruits of free grace.

1 Cor. 4:7, ‘Who maketh thee to differ from another? and what hast thou that thou hast not received? and if thou hast received it, why dost thou glory as though thou hadst not received it? Who maketh thee to differ?’

This age is full of such proud monsters, but an humble soul sees free grace to be the spring and fountain of all his mercies and comforts. He writes free grace upon all his temporals, and upon all his spirituals.”

–Thomas Brooks, The Unsearchable Riches of Christ, in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart, vol. 3 (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1661/1866), 39.

“Preach Christ” by Thomas Brooks

“It is the great work and duty of ministers to preach Jesus Christ to the people because that is the only way to save and to win souls to Jesus Christ. There is no other way of winning and saving souls, but by the preaching of Christ to the people.

In Acts 4:10–12 compared, ‘Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved.’ You may preach this and that, and a thousand things to the people, and yet never better them, never win them.

It is only preaching of Christ, that allures and draws souls to Christ: John 17:3, ‘This is life eternal, to know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent.’ Ah, nothing melts the hearts of sinners, nor wins upon the hearts of sinners, like the preaching of the Lord Jesus.

It is true, the teaching of this and that opinion, may please many a man’s fancy, but it is only the preaching of Christ that changes the heart, that conquers the heart, that turns the heart. Peter, by preaching of a crucified Christ, converts three thousand souls at once, Acts 2:14–42.

Were Christ more preached, men would be more enamoured with him. He is only precious to them that hear of him, and that believe in him. Christ is in all respects incomparable; and therefore, as you would honour him, and win upon others, make him more and more known to the world, 1 Peter 2:7.”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 208.

“He is worth more than a thousand worlds” by Thomas Brooks

“Sinners, don’t you deceive your own souls: sin and your souls must part, or Christ and your souls can never meet. Sin and your souls must be two, or Christ and your souls can never be one.

Christ is a most precious commodity; He is better than rubies, Prov. 8:11, or the most costly pearls. And you must part with your old gold, with your shining gold, your old sins, your most shining sins, or you must perish forever.

Christ is to be sought and bought with any pains, at any price. We cannot buy this gold too dear. He is a jewel worth more than a thousand worlds, as all know that have Him. Get Him, and get all; miss Him and miss all.”

–Thomas Brooks, “The Unsearchable Riches of Christ,” in The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks, Volume 3, ed. Alexander Balloch Grosart (Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert, 1866), 203.